Productivity in manufacturing industries - Canada, Japan and the United States, 1953-1986

was the "productivity slowdown" reversed?
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Dept. of Economics and Institute for Policy Analysis, University of Toronto , Toronto
Industrial productivity -- Canada., Industrial productivity -- Japan., Industrial productivity -- United St
Statementby M. Denny ... [et al.].
SeriesWorking paper series / Dept. of Economics and Institute for Policy Analysis, University of Toronto -- no. 9128., Working paper series (University of Toronto. Institute for Policy Analysis) -- no. 9128.
ContributionsDenny, M., University of Toronto. Institute for Policy Analysis., University of Toronto. Dept. of Economics.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC120.I52 P76 1991
The Physical Object
Pagination30 p. --
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18576690M

Downloadable (with restrictions). This paper analyzes total factor productivity growth and trends in relative efficiency levels in the national Two-Digit Manufacturing industries of Japan, Canada, and the United States during the last quarter-century. The well-known slowdown in productivity growth rates in the period was a common phenomenon across the three countries but was felt most.

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Productivity in Manufacturing Industries, Canada, Japan and the United States, Was the 'Productivity Slowdown' Reversed. By M. Denny, J. Bernstein, M. Fuss, S. Nakamura and L. Waverman Abstract. Productivity Growth in the Motor Vehicle Industry, A Comparison of Canada, Japan, and the United States Melvyn Fuss and Leonard Waverman 4.

Comparison and Analysis of Productivity Growth and R&D Investment in the Electrical Machinery Industries of the United States and Japan M. Ishaq Nadiri and Ingmar R. Prucha 5. Productivity Growth in the Motor Vehicle Industry, A Comparison of Canada, Japan, and the United States -- Melvyn Fuss and Leonard Waverman -- 4.

Comparison and Analysis of Productivity Growth and R & D Investment in the Electrical Machinery Industries of the United States and Japan -- M. Ishaq Nadiri and Ingmar R.

Description Productivity in manufacturing industries - Canada, Japan and the United States, 1953-1986 FB2

Prucha -- 5. Productivity Growth in the Motor Vehicle Industry, A Comparison of Canada, Japan, and the United States: Melvyn Fuss, Leonard Waverman (p. 85 - Cited by: Productivity Growth in the Autarobile Industry, — A Conparison of Canada, Japan and the United States ABSTR7CT In this paper we calculate and analyze the autorrobile industries cost and productivity experience during the 's in Canada, the U.S.

and Japan. Utilizing an econonetric cost function methodology, we are. This study uses the standard methodology for measuring industry-of-origin or production-side PPP, and compares the unit values of manufacturing products in China, Japan, Korea and the United States, derives unit value ratios (UVRs) and hence estimates relative price levels for individual manufacturing industries for ca.

with the US as the. Industrial Production - Year Historical Chart. This interactive chart tracks the Federal Reserve's Industrial Production Index, which measures real output for all facilities located in the United States manufacturing, mining, and electric, and gas utilities (excluding those in U.S.

territories). Japan’s productivity growth has been hobbled by inadequate competitive pressures and a rigid labor market After making rapid leaps forward in the s and s, productivity growth has steadily eroded in almost every sector, including Japan’s signature advanced manufacturing industries.

advanced manufacturing industries. Policy changes can create the right conditions for reigniting growth, but Japan needs a greater focus on what individual companies can do immediately and on their own. In fact, launching a major private-sector initiative to transform Japan’s productivity performance can constitute a “fourth arrow” of.

K. Conrad, Productivity and cost gaps in manufacturing industries Conrad, K. and D.W. Jorgenson,Sectoral productivity gaps between the United States, Japan and Germanyin: H.

Giersch, ed., Probleme und Perspektiven der weltwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung (Duncker-Humblot, Berlin). We investigate the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) and environmental regulation on the rate of growth of total factor productivity (TFP) in the Quebec manufacturing sector during the –88 period.

Our results show that environmental regulation and OSH protective reassignments (a prevention policy with respect to OSH) have led to a reduction in productivity growth, while the. Downloadable. In this paper we calculate and analyze the automobile industries cost and productivity experience during the 's in Canada, the Japan.

Utilizing an econometric cost function methodology, we are able to isolate the major source of short-run disequilibrium in this industry-variations' in capacity utilization-and analyze its effects on cost and total factor productivity.

Industry Origins of TFP-gap Manufacturing vs Services. Relative Prices Required for Productivity Comparison Industry-Level PPPs for 42 US-Japan Common Industry Classification Gross Output: X Capital Service: K and Capital Acquisition: A United States Japan Note: All figures are average annual growth added is aggregated from.

Labor Disputes and Productivity in Japan and the United States Alice C. Lam, J. Norsworthy, Craig A. Zabala. Chapter in NBER book Productivity Growth in Japan and the United States (), Charles R.

Hulten, editor (p. - ) Conference held August Get this from a library. Canada-United States price and productivity differences in manufacturing industries. [E C West] -- From the Preface: This comparative study of Canadian and United States manufacturing industries reflects the Council's continuing research into reasons for persistent differences in levels of.

ufacturing of three countries-Germany, Japan, and the United States- since The productivity level estimates are based on the industry- of-origin approach, making use of detailed information.

United States Canada As As published Adjusted published Adjusted –96 –92 –96 Notice that trends for the two U.S. series are identical, while the Canadian series differ slightly. The logging indus-tries in the United States and Canada both demonstrate nega-tive productivity growth.

The knowledge economy (or the knowledge-based economy) is an economic system in which the production of goods and services is based principally on knowledge-intensive activities that contribute to a rapid pace of advancement in technical and scientific innovation as well as accelerated obsolescence.

The key element of value is the greater dependence on human capital and intellectual property. This strategy takes advantage of Japan’s strengths in manufacturing and technology, targeting the development of US$ trillion of new industries and million jobs by 23 The government designated four key priority areas: innovative energy and environmental products, technologies and practices; the medical sector, including.

Survey of Canada," claims that: "In general, the growth of Canadian produc­ tivity is declining; yet if Canada is to remain a high-wage economy, it has to be a high­ productivity one.

Details Productivity in manufacturing industries - Canada, Japan and the United States, 1953-1986 FB2

Annual productivity growth, which has been % in ,fell to % in And the growth of Cana­ dian manufacturing productivity has slowed. The productivity of the industry that uses more of the purchased non-industrial services is overstated compared to the other country.

For aggregate manufacturing, evidence to show that the amount of non-industrial services differs substantially across countries is rather weak. For the United States, purchased services accounted for.

Wage Repression, Asset Price Inflation, and Structural Change Caused Rising Macroeconomic Inequality for Fifty Years from before Reagan through is a summary of a new book that is being published as part of a new book series with Cambridge University Press.

Manufacturing still accounted for more than 26 percent of the GDP in (Facts and Figures89). Japan ranked second in the world behind China in the production of crude steel, trailed only the United States in the production of four-wheeled motor vehicles, and was the world's leading producer of machine tools (Tanaka42– Inoutput per hour in manufacturing declined in Canada, Japan, and the United States.

[Chart data—TXT] Labor productivity (measured by output per hour) was unchanged in Sweden, and it grew in the remaining nine economies for which comparable data are available.

The economy of Canada is a highly developed market economy. It is the 10th largest GDP by nominal and 16th largest GDP by PPP in the world.

As with other developed nations, the country's economy is dominated by the service industry which employs about three quarters of Canadians. Canada has the third highest total estimated value of natural resources, valued at US$ trillion in Moving along an income growth trajectory through expansion of manufacturing is hardly unique.

Indeed Western Europe, Canada, Australia and the United States all attained high levels of income per capita by shifting from agrarian-based production to manufacturing. Weak productivity performance. In the second chapter of Made in America, the commission observes, "In view of all the turmoil over the apparently declining stature of American industry, it may come as a surprise that the United States still leads the world in productivity." But in the same paragraph, it notes that "American productivity is not.

ter industry, Japan has recorded yearly double-digit productivity gains both before and after the oil shock of Japan has already become more productive than we are in a number of industries and, if present trends continue, will pass the United States in overall productivity sometime in the early 's.

THIS PAPER EXPLORES the comparative productivity performance in manufacturing of three countries-Germany, Japan, and the United States since The productivity. At its peak in the s and s, automobile manufacturing was the largest, most profitable industry in the United States and residents of industry hubs like Detroit and Flint, Michigan had some of the highest incomes in the country.

Over the last half-century, the industry has declined, and American automakers now struggle to stay s: 5.Comparisons of industry sectors in advanced economies since the s show that the construction sector has lagged in productivity growth rates, especially in the United States.

Although the US and Canadian economies are highly integrated, Canada’s experience differs in key ways.C. Jackson Grayson, Jr. Chairman, American Productivity Center Schonberger's book arrives "just in time" and with "total quality" -- two characteristics that he says are the keys to Japanese success.

The book truly arrives just in time to offset a rash of superficial books and articles about Japanese manufacturing that skim the surface compared Reviews: 8.